Ten Things a Pastor Should Do: #4- Set healthy boundaries.

There it was, the survey I had dreaded to see. I clicked a link and went to an article on CNN called, 10 Signs you might be addicted to your smartphone. Ugh. I knew what I would see: “Blah, blah, blah, you’re checking your phone too much, blah, blah, blah, your too plugged in.” Yeah, I know it. What about it?

I even took the Smartphone Abuse Test, and, after trying to answer every question honestly, I scored 9/15. Not bad, right? Wrong. The makers of the survey let me know, in no uncertain terms, that answering having as low as a 5/15 means that you have a problem. Ouch!

Okay, there’s no reason to deny it, I look at my phone a lot. I mean, a lot. I get emails, texts, Facebook and Twitter messages, and once in a while, I even get a phone call. Needless to say, my phone runs out of its battery real fast, and life lived in the 5% battery range is both disturbing and thrilling at the same time.

Here’s what’s even scarier: I have gotten a whole lot better than in the past. There was once a time that whenever I saw a picture of me (and my wife takes a ton of pictures), the cell was attached to my ear. I have made adjustments, and though I do need to make even more, I know it’s progress, not perfection.

The greater point is this: Whether it’s electronic devices, long hours, or whatever you focus a whole lot on, a pastor with many, many demands and many duties must set healthy boundaries. This is for the sake of your marriage, your family, and your overall health in life and ministry. Cell phones should go off at a certain time. Email and texts can wait. Your kids and spouse should not see your face in front of an electronic device more than they see your face in front of them. In fact, they should see you period, like when they play in a game and you cheer them on from the stands or they have that bit part in the school play and yet still look for your face in the audience. After all, there are no small parts or meaningless games, especially if you are their biggest cheerleader.

Set a healthy boundary. Place being a husband, parent, and citizen of Heaven first. Keep the nonurgent question in the nonurgent category and wait to respond until you are back in the office. That text or email you got can wait (it really can), only to be efficiently answered by you the next day. Limit your ministry nights to no more than four nights, and let everyone know this rule should apply to others in the church too.

Can’t wait to take this test again in a few months. Will keep you posted.

Until He comes again,

Pastor Fran

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